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HeartSprings Missions in Ecuador
GUANPURO, OTOVOLO (OCTOBER 14, 2009)

(WRITTEN BY STEVE JONES WHO WENT WITH HIS WIFE, KAREN, AND SERGIO AND NIXIE MORA TO ECUADOR)

On October 14, on Wednesday morning, Pastor Henry, HeartSprings international director for Ecuador, came for us at our hotel.  He is a very precious, Godly man with a wonderfully tender heart and great love and compassion for his people.   He and his wife, Heidy, pastor a church of 5,000 members in the southern portion of Quito..  He drove the five of us two and one-half hours north to the town of Otovolo (prounced  Oto-voll'-o) where we picked up the mayor of a small outlying village.  This village lies to the north of Quito, quite close to the border with Columbia.  Our goal here was to make a permanent the installation of the first chlorine generator we had placed in Ecuador in May.  During the initial feasibility study, Mayor Manuel had accepted Jesus as his savior under Sergio and Nixie's preaching, and promised to build a small shed beside the water tank to house the chlorine generator and its associated equipment.  When Sergio and Nixie had returned a month or so later to install the chlorine generator, they found that the small shed was not built.   Mayor Manuel explained that he thought the offer of the chlorine generator was a lie because others had come to his village with big promises but no follow-through.  He arose with weeping in the midst of the village meeting and apologized and asked for forgiveness.  He said, "Now I know that when your God says He will do something, then He will do it!" 
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GUANGAJE (OCTOBER 15, 2009)

Thursday continued.  In due time, we turned off the main road unto what was supposed to be a dirt trail, but to Sergio and Nixie's amazement, it had been paved since they were here in May.  They had prayed for the road conditions with the people of Guangaje, and we now were driving upon the very answer to those prayers.  The government had decided "on its own" (you think God had prodded them?) to pave about 3 or 4 miles thus greatly improving the travel conditions.  As we drove to the community water tank of Guangaje, we saw about 150 people who were setting a concrete electric pole so as to be ready for the electric company to run their lines (due a few days from now).  There were 20-25 people on each of several ropes to steady the pole as they pulled it into position.  Some men had tied long wood poles together to act as push/brace poles until the electric pole was in place and the hole backfilled and tamped in solid.   It was amazing to see women with their babies strapped on their backs, carrying rocks to be placed in the hole along with the dirt that the men were shoveling in.  One man stepped to the side with a rock suspended from a rope as a make-shift plumb bob, and directed which group of rope-holders to pull the pole so that it was finally set plumb and solid.
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GUANGAJE FAMILY (OCTOBER 15, 2009)

(WRITTEN BY STEVE JONES WHO WENT WITH HIS WIFE, KAREN, AND SERGIO AND NIXIE MORA TO ECUADOR)

On Thursday October 15, we left our hotel in Quito for the five hour drive to the remote village of Guangaje (Won-gah'-he), located far to the south of Quito at an altitude of 15,000 feet (that's three miles above sea level).   (Guangaje was the site of our first new Safe Water System installation for this trip.) The Andes Mountains were stunning in their splendor and sheer size, with several peaks covered with a beautiful white cap of snow glittering like jewels in the sun.  We were perhaps 30 minutes from Guangaje when another miracle occurred.  We saw what looked like a hay stack close to the road, but upon closer inspection, it proved to be a house.  As we paused on the road to get a picture or four, a young boy and his yet younger sister ran down the path to the road and invited us to come up and visit his home if "we would pay a little money".  Nixie translated for Karen and me, and was utterly amazed at this invitation.  She told us that the Andes Indian mountain people NEVER, NEVER invite foreigners to their houses. 
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GRAMABAMBA (OCTOBER 16, 2009)

(WRITTEN BY STEVE JONES WHO WENT WITH HIS WIFE, KAREN, AND SERGIO AND NIXIE MORA TO ECUADOR)

Have you ever felt like you could touch the clouds?    We did, as we travelled the final forty minutes on a dirt road to our next Safe Water System installation site; we kept climbing and climbing and climbing.  We were very thankful that the car was equipped with 4-wheel drive, or we might still be pushing the car up the mountain.  After many twists, turns, and switchbacks, we arrived at the small community of Gramabamba.
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Rain From Heavean
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